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Real Dangers of Sugar

Heart Threat – Sugar has been shown to affect the involuntary muscle activity of the heart. A molecule found in ordinary table sugar called G6P has a negative impact on the heart tissue at the cellular level.

Excess consumption of sugar and a sedentary lifestyle can increase a person’s risk of developing heart failure. Heart failure often claims people’s lives in less than a decade after diagnosis.

Belly Fat – There has been an alarming rise in obesity rates in teenagers and small children these past few decades. One of the major contributing factors to this trend is an increase in the consumption of fructose. Fructose is an inexpensive form of sugar used in soda, ice cream, cookies and even bread products.

Fructose appears to boost the growth of visceral fat or the fat found in our midsections. When a child develops mature visceral fat early in life, he/she has a higher risk of being obese in adulthood.

Deadly Appetite – Our bodies are naturally equipped with mechanisms that tell us when to stop eating. Studies show that sugar has found a way to suspend those natural mechanisms. Consuming foods and beverages rich in sugar contributes to the development of a condition called leptin resistance.

When a person has leptin resistance, they don’t feel full and satisfied with moderate amounts of food, so they continue consuming excessive amounts of food every time they eat.

Our bodies also have a tough time detecting the presence of sugar in beverages. It’s difficult for the body to send a signal that you already consumed a lot of calories from soda or juices because this substance just doesn’t register the same way as other types of food.

Toxic to the Liver – Excessive consumption of table sugar and other variants like high fructose corn syrup can disturb normal liver function, which can then lead to liver disease. Medical researchers have discovered that fructose and other sugars make use of the same metabolic channels that ethanol uses, which makes it just as dangerous as alcohol.